Hector The Well Endowed

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The Importance of Being Earnest, Oscar Wilde


This must be why Dr. Kelso always looks happy when he has a muffin…

The Importance of Being Earnest, Oscar Wilde

image

This must be why Dr. Kelso always looks happy when he has a muffin…

(via npr)

I see some mountaintop ultimate?… I’m in. 

I see some mountaintop ultimate?… I’m in. 

The problem, often not discovered until late in life, is that when you look for things in life like love, meaning, motivation, it implies they are sitting behind a tree or under a rock. The most successful people in life recognize, that in life they create their own love, they manufacture their own meaning, they generate their own motivation. For me, I am driven by two main philosophies, know more today about the world than I knew yesterday. And lessen the suffering of others. You’d be surprised how far that gets you.
Neil deGrasse Tyson (via larmoyante)
What is your opinion on GMOS?
kristinabaker22 kristinabaker22 Said:

sagansense:

This rap (shared by Joe Hanson of “It’s Okay To Be Smart) should communicate my informed opinion on GMO’s. 

Petroleum companies (otherwise known as “big oil corporations”) are paying large sums of money to fund advertising campaigns which communicate their “clean coal” and “clean energy” (like natural gas) to the general public (otherwise known as “consumers”). Well, those same corporations are also funneling large sums of “dark money” to special interest groups which support the climate change denial movement. 

Although the anti-GMO movement isn’t exactly in the position to financially swarm everyone with their campaign activism, the scare-tactics which have been implemented by anti-GMO activists are noticeable and effective amidst a generally scientifically illiterate population

Monsanto is a big corporation. Monsanto implements GMO’s amongst a laundry list of products sold by a certain lot of companies in which the so called “super-seeds” Monsanto produces are sold to farmers who grow the ingredients these companies use. 

Because Monsanto — being a mastodon of an agricultural corporation — has a Comcast/Verizon-like monopoly on the food and farming industry, their herbicide ‘Roundup’ came under fire when the weed-killer was defied by super weeds, invasive species, and insect pests began to evolve a resistance to the GMO crops. Obviously, this does not point a bad finger at GMO’s…it just shows us that nature is smarter than we, and we’re going to have to keep plugging at this whole bio-engineering thing (or alternative options) because the reason we are even producing “super crops” is due to — oh so ironically — human induced climate change.

Go figure. 

So if we wish to feed the growing 7+ billion human residents on this planet, GMO’s are the way to go, because we’re genetically modifying them to grow in areas of the world never thought possible (P.S., that’s a great thing for space exploration and human expansion upon other worlds).

We’re still figuring out the best way to truly go about this, but what’s for certain is the science. And there is no scientific evidence that GMO’s pose a risk. The problem is the economic system we have had in place amidst the time we’ve altered our climate, the landscape, and forced our own species to become reliant on big corporations all for the sake of money…which is funny…I don’t recall I’m familiar with what money tastes like….maybe we should focus less on profit and more on people, eh?

I’ve repeated this quote from Carl Sagan so many times, but I’ll say it again because it applies to this as well…

"We live in society fully dependent on science and technology, whereby nobody understands science and technology…this combustible mixture of ignorance and power is sooner or later going to blow up in our faces."

The anti-GMO movement is to agriculture what the anti-vaccine movement is to health.

It’s obviously difficult to trust a government which on one hand wants you to “eat healthy” and buy these certain brands of food from the companies who have the right amount of money to advertise to you the way it’s always been done, and in a way that makes you feel like you’re doing something right. I mean, they have your (our) best interests in mind. Right? That becomes harder to believe when you are then flooded with advertisements for liquor and soda. But what about diabetes? And aren’t alcohol-related deaths the highest they’ve ever been? It becomes tricky to just “go along with things” the way they’ve always been done…especially when they fly in the face of…you know, your survival.

Healthy skepticism is important. Practicing critical thinking every day is essential. But difficult, in the dark sea of industry and economics, fueled by promotional advertising while being bolstered by the pillars of capitalism. 

It’s no wonder there’s such skepticism about skepticism.

Read this blog post comparing the anti-GMO movement and Creationists…it should drive all this home pretty clearly.

All the variety, all the charm, all the beauty of life is made up of light and shadow.
Leo Tolstoy, Anna Karenina
I just saw a shooting star
We can wish upon it
But we won’t share the wish we made
But I cant keep no secrets,
I wish that you would always stay
The Avett Brothers, “Laundry Room”

npr:

"Can It Be? Parrots Name Their Children, And Those Names, Like Ours, Stick For Life"

"Oh Romeo, oh Romeo," cried Juliet. Being human, she and her boyfriend had names. Is there any other animal that does this? Has names for each other? Oddly enough, yes!

(via skunkbear)

sagansense:

Earth’s upper atmosphere—below freezing, nearly without oxygen, flooded by UV radiation—is no place to live. But last winter, scientists from the Georgia Institute of Technology discovered that billions of bacteria actually thrive up there.

Expecting only a smattering of microorganisms, the researchers flew six miles above Earth’s surface in a NASA jet plane. There, they pumped outside air through a filter to collect particles.

Back on the ground, they tallied the organisms, and the count was staggering: 20 percent of what they had assumed to be just dust or other particles was alive. Earth, it seems, is surrounded by a bubble of bacteria.
Now what? Read the whole story over at PopSci…

sagansense:

Earth’s upper atmosphere—below freezing, nearly without oxygen, flooded by UV radiation—is no place to live. But last winter, scientists from the Georgia Institute of Technology discovered that billions of bacteria actually thrive up there.

image

Expecting only a smattering of microorganisms, the researchers flew six miles above Earth’s surface in a NASA jet plane. There, they pumped outside air through a filter to collect particles.

image

Back on the ground, they tallied the organisms, and the count was staggering: 20 percent of what they had assumed to be just dust or other particles was alive. Earth, it seems, is surrounded by a bubble of bacteria.

imageNow what? Read the whole story over at PopSci

I have some “friends” they don’t know who I am
So I write quotations around the word friends
The Avett Brothers, “All My Mistakes”
I knew who I was this morning, but I’ve changed a few times since then.
 Lewis Carroll, Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland & Through the Looking-Glass  (via larmoyante)

currentsinbiology:

Daphnia magna (freshwater flea) -The daphnia has both sexual and asexual phases. In most environments, the population consists entirely of females that reproduce asexually.  Under adverse conditions, males are produced, and sexual reproduction begins. The result is the laying of resting or “winter” eggs, protected by a hardened coat called the ephippium . Factors that can trigger this are a lack of food, low oxygen supply, a high population density, or low temperatures

Image: Jerzy Rojkowski, Kraków, Poland

Technique: Differential Interference Contrast, Image Stacking (200x)

fishingboatproceeds:

The experience of making The Fault in Our Stars was really wonderful because of the people involved: They all brought their talent and professionalism to the story and I’m so proud of the movie they made. 

It was all so fun and magical (and frankly so different from my previous Hollywood experiences) that to be honest I wasn’t particularly keen to make another movie—unless I could work again with people I really trust. 

And now it has happened! I’m really excited that the same team is reuniting to adapt Paper Towns. It will again be written by Weber and Neustadter, and again produced by Wyck Godfrey and Isaac Klausner. We’re working with the same people at the same studio (Erin Siminoff and Elizabeth Gabler at Fox 2000), and the project is being built around Nat Wolff, who plays Isaac in The Fault in Our Stars

Like any movie project, this will be a longish road with many potential roadblocks, but I know it will be lots of fun and really rewarding to work again with such passionate and talented people.

p.s. I’m an executive producer this time around, which is exciting!

This just made me so happy.

Space is to place as eternity is to time.

Joseph Joubert (1754-1824)

That’s deep. Both of ‘em.

(via jtotheizzoe)

(via jtotheizzoe)